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Comune di Scapoli

 

Cittadinanza Italiana

In 2009 my oldest cousin Rich began the process to obtain Italian Citizenship. My grandparents are both 100% Italian, with eligibility on both ends of lineage. In early 2012, my Mother decided to carry on what Rich had started because she saw it as an opportunity to give my brother and I more options to live and work abroad if we felt that was something we wanted to do, as well as herself. It was obvious by then that neither of us had plans to become President or hold high office as an elected official, so she proceeded. 

Originally she made an appointment with the Italian consulate in Newark, NJ. The earliest available appointment was Christmas Eve of 2013 (22 months in advance). Fast forward a year - I was taking a photography course in Paris, France for a few weeks during RISD's wintersession term and the idea of traveling Europe was something I'd always dreamed of. This sparked new interest for my mom, so she decided to research every possible way to obtain citizenship in order to know what she was dealing with before her long-awaited appointment at the consulate. 

Thus, she finds Peter Farina, founder of italyMondo, a heritage service that helps others discover their own Italian stories through family trees, find relatives in Italy, but most importantly provides dual Italian citizenship services. Peter explained that there was an option to skip the consulate and claim citizenship in Italy; a good option if one wanted to have a nice vacation and deal with as little paperwork as possible to claim citizenship while there. 

Essentially, the process is that you establish temporary residency and then claim citizenship by presenting all the assembled documents. The documents include every single birth, marriage, death and divorce certificate with a certified seal and an Apostille affixed in addition to having each document translated to Italian done by a certified translator. Within 6 months, you acquire citizenship and obtain your new passports from the consulate in your state of residency (in the U.S.). 

Grace RiveraComment